Aging, Lifespan & Longevity

Epigenetic upregulation of FKBP5 by aging and stress contributes to NF-κB-driven inflammation and cardiovascular risk.

15 hours 28 minutes ago
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Epigenetic upregulation of FKBP5 by aging and stress contributes to NF-κB-driven inflammation and cardiovascular risk.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2019 May 21;:

Authors: Zannas AS, Jia M, Hafner K, Baumert J, Wiechmann T, Pape JC, Arloth J, Ködel M, Martinelli S, Roitman M, Röh S, Haehle A, Emeny RT, Iurato S, Carrillo-Roa T, Lahti J, Räikkönen K, Eriksson JG, Drake AJ, Waldenberger M, Wahl S, Kunze S, Lucae S, Bradley B, Gieger C, Hausch F, Smith AK, Ressler KJ, Müller-Myhsok B, Ladwig KH, Rein T, Gassen NC, Binder EB

Abstract
Aging and psychosocial stress are associated with increased inflammation and disease risk, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. Because both aging and stress are also associated with lasting epigenetic changes, a plausible hypothesis is that stress along the lifespan could confer disease risk through epigenetic effects on molecules involved in inflammatory processes. Here, by combining large-scale analyses in human cohorts with experiments in cells, we report that FKBP5, a protein implicated in stress physiology, contributes to these relations. Across independent human cohorts (total n > 3,000), aging synergized with stress-related phenotypes, measured with childhood trauma and major depression questionnaires, to epigenetically up-regulate FKBP5 expression. These age/stress-related epigenetic effects were recapitulated in a cellular model of replicative senescence, whereby we exposed replicating human fibroblasts to stress (glucocorticoid) hormones. Unbiased genome-wide analyses in human blood linked higher FKBP5 mRNA with a proinflammatory profile and altered NF-κB-related gene networks. Accordingly, experiments in immune cells showed that higher FKBP5 promotes inflammation by strengthening the interactions of NF-κB regulatory kinases, whereas opposing FKBP5 either by genetic deletion (CRISPR/Cas9-mediated) or selective pharmacological inhibition prevented the effects on NF-κB. Further, the age/stress-related epigenetic signature enhanced FKBP5 response to NF-κB through a positive feedback loop and was present in individuals with a history of acute myocardial infarction, a disease state linked to peripheral inflammation. These findings suggest that aging/stress-driven FKBP5-NF-κB signaling mediates inflammation, potentially contributing to cardiovascular risk, and may thus point to novel biomarker and treatment possibilities.

PMID: 31113877 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Epigenetic clock analysis of human fibroblasts in vitro: effects of hypoxia, donor age, and expression of hTERT and SV40 largeT.

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Epigenetic clock analysis of human fibroblasts in vitro: effects of hypoxia, donor age, and expression of hTERT and SV40 largeT.

Aging (Albany NY). 2019 May 21;:

Authors: Matsuyama M, WuWong DJ, Horvath S, Matsuyama S

Abstract
Aging is associated with a genome-wide change of DNA methylation (DNAm). "DNAm age" is defined as the predicted chronological age by the age estimator based on DNAm. The estimator is called the epigenetic clock. The molecular mechanism underlining the epigenetic clock is still unknown. Here, we evaluated the effects of hypoxia and two immortalization factors, hTERT and SV40-LargeT (LT), on the DNAm age of human fibroblasts in vitro. We detected the cell division-associated progression of DNAm age after >10 population doublings. Moreover, the progression of DNAm age was slower under hypoxia (1% oxygen) compared to normoxia (21% oxygen), suggesting that oxygen levels determine the speed of the epigenetic aging. We show that the speed of cell division-associated DNAm age progression depends on the chronological age of the cell donor. hTERT expression did not arrest cell division-associated progression of DNAm age in most cells. SV40LT expression produced inconsistent effects, including rejuvenation of DNAm age. Our results show that a) oxygen and the targets of SV40LT (e.g. p53) modulate epigenetic aging rates and b) the chronological age of donor cells determines the speed of mitosis-associated DNAm age progression in daughter cells.

PMID: 31113906 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Degenerative protein modifications in the aging vasculature and central nervous system: a problem shared is not always halved.

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Degenerative protein modifications in the aging vasculature and central nervous system: a problem shared is not always halved.

Ageing Res Rev. 2019 May 19;:100909

Authors: Gallart-Palau X, Tan LM, Serra A, Gao Y, Ho HH, Richards AM, Kandiah N, Chen CP, Kalaria RN, Kwan Sze S

Abstract
Aging influences the pathogenesis and progression of several major diseases affecting both the cardiovascular system (CVS) and central nervous system (CNS). Defining the common molecular features that underpin these disorders in these crucial body systems will likely lead to increased quality of life and improved 'health-span' in the global aging population. Degenerative protein modifications (DPMs) have been strongly implicated in the molecular pathogenesis of several age-related diseases affecting the CVS and CNS, including atherosclerosis, heart disease, dementia syndromes, and stroke. However, these isolated findings have yet to be integrated into a wider framework, which considers the possibility that, despite their distinct features, CVS and CNS disorders may in fact be closely related phenomena. In this work, we review the current literature describing molecular roles of the major age-associated DPMs thought to significantly impact on human health, including carbamylation, citrullination and deamidation. In particular, we focus on data indicating that specific DPMs are shared between multiple age-related diseases in both CVS and CNS settings. By contextualizing these data, we aim to assist future studies in defining the universal mechanisms that underpin both vascular and neurological manifestations of age-related protein degeneration.

PMID: 31116994 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Late-life time-restricted feeding and exercise differentially alter healthspan in obesity.

1 day 17 hours ago
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Late-life time-restricted feeding and exercise differentially alter healthspan in obesity.

Aging Cell. 2019 May 21;:e12966

Authors: Schafer MJ, Mazula DL, Brown AK, White TA, Atkinson E, Pearsall VM, Aversa Z, Verzosa GC, Smith LA, Matveyenko A, Miller JD, LeBrasseur NK

Abstract
Aging and obesity increase multimorbidity and disability risk, and determining interventions for reversing healthspan decline is a critical public health priority. Exercise and time-restricted feeding (TRF) benefit multiple health parameters when initiated in early life, but their efficacy and safety when initiated at older ages are uncertain. Here, we tested the effects of exercise versus TRF in diet-induced obese, aged mice from 20 to 24 months of age. We characterized healthspan across key domains: body composition, physical, metabolic, and cardiovascular function, activity of daily living (ADL) behavior, and pathology. We demonstrate that both exercise and TRF improved aspects of body composition. Exercise uniquely benefited physical function, and TRF uniquely benefited metabolism, ADL behavior, and circulating indicators of liver pathology. No adverse outcomes were observed in exercised mice, but in contrast, lean mass and cardiovascular maladaptations were observed following TRF. Through a composite index of benefits and risks, we conclude the net healthspan benefits afforded by exercise are more favorable than those of TRF. Extrapolating to obese older adults, exercise is a safe and effective option for healthspan improvement, but additional comprehensive studies are warranted before recommending TRF.

PMID: 31111669 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Rapamycin directly activates lysosomal mucolipin TRP channels independent of mTOR.

1 day 17 hours ago
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Rapamycin directly activates lysosomal mucolipin TRP channels independent of mTOR.

PLoS Biol. 2019 May;17(5):e3000252

Authors: Zhang X, Chen W, Gao Q, Yang J, Yan X, Zhao H, Su L, Yang M, Gao C, Yao Y, Inoki K, Li D, Shao R, Wang S, Sahoo N, Kudo F, Eguchi T, Ruan B, Xu H

Abstract
Rapamycin (Rap) and its derivatives, called rapalogs, are being explored in clinical trials targeting cancer and neurodegeneration. The underlying mechanisms of Rap actions, however, are not well understood. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), a lysosome-localized protein kinase that acts as a critical regulator of cellular growth, is believed to mediate most Rap actions. Here, we identified mucolipin 1 (transient receptor potential channel mucolipin 1 [TRPML1], also known as MCOLN1), the principle Ca2+ release channel in the lysosome, as another direct target of Rap. Patch-clamping of isolated lysosomal membranes showed that micromolar concentrations of Rap and some rapalogs activated lysosomal TRPML1 directly and specifically. Pharmacological inhibition or genetic inactivation of mTOR failed to mimic the Rap effect. In vitro binding assays revealed that Rap bound directly to purified TRPML1 proteins with a micromolar affinity. In both healthy and disease human fibroblasts, Rap and rapalogs induced autophagic flux via nuclear translocation of transcription factor EB (TFEB). However, such effects were abolished in TRPML1-deficient cells or by TRPML1 inhibitors. Hence, Rap and rapalogs promote autophagy via a TRPML1-dependent mechanism. Given the demonstrated roles of TRPML1 and TFEB in cellular clearance, we propose that lysosomal TRPML1 may contribute a significant portion to the in vivo neuroprotective and anti-aging effects of Rap via an augmentation of autophagy and lysosomal biogenesis.

PMID: 31112550 [PubMed - in process]

Exploration of age-related mitochondrial dysfunction and the anti-aging effects of resveratrol in zebrafish retina.

2 days 19 hours ago
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Exploration of age-related mitochondrial dysfunction and the anti-aging effects of resveratrol in zebrafish retina.

Aging (Albany NY). 2019 May 19;:

Authors: Wang N, Luo Z, Jin M, Sheng W, Wang HT, Long X, Wu Y, Hu P, Xu H, Zhang X

Abstract
It is currently believed that aging is closely linked with mitochondrial dysfunction, and that resveratrol exhibits anti-aging and neuroprotective effects by improving mitochondrial function, even though the mechanisms are not well defined. This study explored mitochondrial quality (mitochondrial DNA integrity and copy number), mitochondrial function (fusion/fission, mitophagy/autophagy), antioxidant system and activity of the Akt/mTOR and Ampk/Sirt1/Pgc1α pathways, and inflammation in aging zebrafish retinas to identify the probable mechanisms of resveratrol's anti-aging and neuroprotective effects. mtDNA integrity, mtDNA copy number, mitochondrial fusion regulators, mitophagy, and antioxidant-related genes were all decreased whereas Akt/mTOR activity and inflammation was increased upon aging in zebrafish retinas. Resveratrol was shown to not only increase mitochondrial quality and function, but also to suppress Akt/mTOR activity in zebrafish retinas. These results support the notion that mitochondrial dysfunction and increased Akt/mTOR activity are major players in age-related retinal neuropathy in zebrafish, and demonstrate a trend towards mitochondrial fragmentation in the aging retina. Importantly, resveratrol promoted mitochondrial function, up-regulating Ampk/Sirt1/Pgc1α, and down-regulated Akt/mTOR pathway activity in zebrafish retinas, suggesting that it may be able to prevent age-related oculopathy.

PMID: 31105084 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Long-term environmental enrichment affects microglial morphology in middle age mice.

4 days 10 hours ago
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Long-term environmental enrichment affects microglial morphology in middle age mice.

Aging (Albany NY). 2019 Apr 29;11(8):2388-2402

Authors: Ali S, Liu X, Queen NJ, Patel RS, Wilkins RK, Mo X, Cao L

Abstract
Aging is associated with increased central nervous system inflammation, in large part due to dysfunctional microglia. Environmental enrichment (EE) provides a model for studying the dynamics of lifestyle factors in the development of age-related neuroinflammation and microglial dysfunction. EE results in improvements in learning and memory, metabolism, and mental health in a variety of animal models. We recently reported that implementing EE in middle age promotes healthy aging. In the present study, we investigated whether EE influences microglial morphology, and whether EE is associated with changes in expression of microglial and neuroinflammatory markers. Inflammatory cytokines and MHC-II were reduced following 12-month EE in 10-month-old mice. Long-term EE for 7.5 months resulted in broad increases in Iba1 expression in hippocampus, hypothalamus, and amygdala detected by immunohistochemistry. Quantification of microglial morphology reveal both hypertrophy and ramification in these three brain regions, without increases in microglial cell density. These data indicate that long-term EE implemented in middle age results in a microglial state distinct from that of normal aging in standard laboratory housing, in specific brain regions, associated with reduced neuroinflammatory markers and improvement of systemic metabolism.

PMID: 31039130 [PubMed - in process]

HPV shapes tumor transcriptome by globally modifying the pool of RNA binding protein-binding motif.

4 days 10 hours ago
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HPV shapes tumor transcriptome by globally modifying the pool of RNA binding protein-binding motif.

Aging (Albany NY). 2019 Apr 29;11(8):2430-2446

Authors: Wu Y, Chen H, Chen Y, Qu L, Zhang E, Wang Z, Wu Y, Yang R, Mao R, Lu C, Fan Y

Abstract
Human papillomavirus (HPV) positive head and neck cancer displayed specific transcription landscape but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully determined. Here, we interestingly found that HPV infection could globally elongate the 3'-untranslated regions (3'UTRs) in the majority of alternative polyadenylation (APA)-containing genes. Counterintuitively, the 3'UTR elongation does not affect their resident gene expression. Rather, they significantly increase the number of binding sites for RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and subsequently upregulate a group of oncogenic genes by absorbing RBPs. A significant fraction of HPV affected genes are regulated through such mechanism that is 3'UTR-mediated recruitment of RBPs. As an example, we observed that HPV infection increases the length of 3'UTR of RBM25 transcript and hence recruits much more RNA binding protein including FUS and DGCR8. Consequently, in the absence of FUS and DGCR8 regulation, PD-1 was rescued and up-regulated after HPV infection. Taken together, our findings not only suggest a novel paradigm of how oncogenic viruses shape tumor transcriptome by modifying the 3'UTR, but also present a previously unrecognized layer of APA-RBP interplay in this molecular hierarchy. Modification of the pool of RBP-binding motif might expand our understandings into virus-associated carcinogenesis.

PMID: 31039132 [PubMed - in process]

Transcriptomic analysis of human IL-7 receptor alpha low and high effector memory CD8+ T cells reveals an age-associated signature linked to influenza vaccine response in older adults.

4 days 10 hours ago
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Transcriptomic analysis of human IL-7 receptor alpha low and high effector memory CD8+ T cells reveals an age-associated signature linked to influenza vaccine response in older adults.

Aging Cell. 2019 May 01;:e12960

Authors: Park HJ, Shin MS, Kim M, Bilsborrow JB, Mohanty S, Montgomery RR, Shaw AC, You S, Kang I

Abstract
Here, we investigated the relationship of the age-associated expansion of IL-7 receptor alpha low (IL-7Rαlow ) effector memory (EM) CD8+ T cells with the global transcriptomic profile of peripheral blood cells in humans. We found 231 aging signature genes of IL-7Rαlow EM CD8+ T cells that corresponded to 15% of the age-associated genes (231/1,497) reported by a meta-analysis study on human peripheral whole blood from approximately 15,000 individuals, having high correlation with chronological age. These aging signature genes were the target genes of several transcription factors including MYC, SATB1, and BATF, which also belonged to the 231 genes, supporting the upstream regulatory role of these transcription factors in altering the gene expression profile of peripheral blood cells with aging. We validated the differential expression of these transcription factors between IL-7Rαlow and high EM CD8+ T cells as well as in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of young and older adults. Finally, we found a significant association with influenza vaccine responses in older adults, suggesting the possible biological significance of the aging signature genes of IL-7Rαlow EM CD8+ T cells. The results of our study support the relationship of the expansion of IL-7Rαlow EM CD8+ T cells with the age-associated changes in the gene expression profile of peripheral blood cells and its possible biological implications.

PMID: 31044512 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

The functional changes of the circadian system organization in aging.

4 days 10 hours ago
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The functional changes of the circadian system organization in aging.

Ageing Res Rev. 2019 Apr 29;52:64-71

Authors: Zhao J, Warman GR, Cheeseman JF

Abstract
The circadian clock drives periodic oscillations at different levels of an organism from genes to behavior. This timing system is highly conserved across species from insects to mammals and human beings. The question of how the circadian clock is involved in the aging process continues to attract more attention. We aim to characterize the detrimental impact of aging on the circadian clock organization. We review studies on different components of the circadian clock at the central and periperal levels, and their changes in aged rodents and humans, and the fruit fly Drosophila. Intracellular signaling, cellular activity and intercellular coupling in the central pacemaker have been found to decline with advancing age. Evidence of degradation of the molecular clockwork reflected by clock gene expression in both central and peripheral oscillators due to aging is inadequate. The findings on age-associated molecular and functional changes of peripheral clocks are mixed. We conclude that aging can affect the circadian clock organization at various levels, and the impairment of the central network may be a fundamental mechanism of circadian disruption seen in aged species.

PMID: 31048031 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Long-term every-other-day administration of DMAMCL has little effect on aging and age-associated physiological decline in mice.

4 days 10 hours ago
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Long-term every-other-day administration of DMAMCL has little effect on aging and age-associated physiological decline in mice.

Aging (Albany NY). 2019 May 02;11(9):2583-2609

Authors: Sun Z, Zhao L, Su L, Fang Q, Xu C, Su Y, Liang Y, Li G, Xue Y, Tong T, Chen J

Abstract
The activation of transcription factor NF-κB is currently identified as one of the driving forces to the aging process. Genetic impairment of NF-κB signaling pathway or pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB activity has been shown to extend healthspan and lifespan in animal models, and delay or reduce many age-related symptoms. However, the aging intervention strategies based on NF-κB inhibition by the suitable small molecular compound is currently still lacking. The water-soluble dimethylaminomicheliolide (DMAMCL), can inhibit NF-κB activity and is currently undergoing clinical trials. In this study, we showed that 15 months of DMAMCL administration started in 1-year old male mice was well-tolerated and safe, and improved or had little effect on some age-associated symptoms, such as neurobehavioral phenotypes, physical performance, cardiac function, hematological parameters, immune aging phenotypes, clinical chemistry parameters, and glucose homeostasis. At the molecular level, DMAMCL administration mitigated serum levels of several age-associated inflammatory cytokines, including IL-6, IL-1α, IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ, and CXCL2, and inhibited NF-κB activity in several aged tissues. Collectively, our results indicate that current strategy of DMAMCL administration may has little effect on aging process in mice, and provide basic clues to further exploit the possibility of DMAMCL-based aging intervention to promote healthy aging.

PMID: 31048563 [PubMed - in process]

Intrinsically aggregation-prone proteins form amyloid-like aggregates and contribute to tissue aging in Caenorhabditis elegans.

4 days 10 hours ago
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Intrinsically aggregation-prone proteins form amyloid-like aggregates and contribute to tissue aging in Caenorhabditis elegans.

Elife. 2019 May 03;8:

Authors: Huang C, Wagner-Valladolid S, Stephens AD, Jung R, Poudel C, Sinnige T, Lechler MC, Schlörit N, Lu M, Laine RF, Michel CH, Vendruscolo M, Kaminski CF, Kaminski Schierle GS, David DC

Abstract
Reduced protein homeostasis leading to increased protein instability is a common molecular feature of aging, but it remains unclear whether this is a cause or consequence of the aging process. In neurodegenerative diseases and other amyloidoses, specific proteins self-assemble into amyloid fibrils and accumulate as pathological aggregates in different tissues. More recently, widespread protein aggregation has been described during normal aging. Until now, an extensive characterization of the nature of age-dependent protein aggregation has been lacking. Here, we show that age-dependent aggregates are rapidly formed by newly synthesized proteins and have an amyloid-like structure resembling that of protein aggregates observed in disease. We then demonstrate that age-dependent protein aggregation accelerates the functional decline of different tissues in C. elegans. Together, these findings imply that amyloid-like aggregates contribute to the aging process and therefore could be important targets for strategies designed to maintain physiological functions in the late stages of life.

PMID: 31050339 [PubMed - in process]

Acyl-CoA-Binding Protein Drives Glioblastoma Tumorigenesis by Sustaining Fatty Acid Oxidation.

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Acyl-CoA-Binding Protein Drives Glioblastoma Tumorigenesis by Sustaining Fatty Acid Oxidation.

Cell Metab. 2019 Apr 28;:

Authors: Duman C, Yaqubi K, Hoffmann A, Acikgöz AA, Korshunov A, Bendszus M, Herold-Mende C, Liu HK, Alfonso J

Abstract
Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) undergoes metabolic reprogramming to meet the high ATP and anabolic demands of the tumor cells. However, the role of fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and its regulators in the GBM context has been largely unknown. Here, we show that the neural stem cell pro-proliferative factor acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP, also known as DBI) is highly expressed in GBM, and by binding to acyl-CoAs, it cell-autonomously maintains high proliferation rates, promoting tumor growth and poor survival in several preclinical models. Mechanistic experiments using ACBP-acyl-CoA binding affinity variants and pharmacological FAO modulators suggest that ACBP supports tumor growth by controlling the availability of long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs to mitochondria, promoting FAO in GBM. Thus, our findings uncover a critical link between lipid metabolism and GBM progression established by ACBP and offer a potential therapeutic strategy for an effective anti-proliferative metabolic management of GBM.

PMID: 31056285 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Downregulation of miR-125b promotes resistance of glioma cells to TRAIL through overexpression of Tafazzin which is a mitochondrial protein.

4 days 10 hours ago
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Downregulation of miR-125b promotes resistance of glioma cells to TRAIL through overexpression of Tafazzin which is a mitochondrial protein.

Aging (Albany NY). 2019 May 05;11(9):2670-2680

Authors: Ma W, Cui Y, Liu M, Tan Z, Jiang Y

Abstract
Overexpression of Tafazzin (TAZ), a mitochondrial protein, is often observed in many cancers. However, the association between aberrant expression of TAZ and drug resistance remains unclear. The aim of this study is to explore the role of TAZ in regulating the TRAIL resistance in glioma. We thus established the TRAIL resistance models on glioma by using the U87 and U251 cell lines (U87/R and U251/R). As the results, obvious overexpression of TAZ was observed in U87/R and U251/R cells. However, knockdown of TAZ increased the sensitivity of U87/R and U251/R cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. By contrast, expression of miR-125b was downregulated in U87/R and U251/R cells compared to the parental U87 and U251 cells. Furthermore, decrease of miR-125b was responsible for overexpression of TAZ, because the results of dual-luciferase reporter assays verified that TAZ was targeted by miR-125b. We then showed that enforced expression of miR-125b resensitized the U87/R and U251/R cells to TRAIL-dependent damage of mitochondria and activation of caspase-9 and -3. We demonstrated that overexpression of TAZ caused by downregulation of miR-125b promoted resistance of glioma cells to TRAIL. MiR-125b/TAZ axis may represent a potential strategy to reverse the TRAIL in glioma.

PMID: 31056533 [PubMed - in process]

Depletion of B cells rejuvenates the peripheral B-cell compartment but is insufficient to restore immune competence in aging.

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Depletion of B cells rejuvenates the peripheral B-cell compartment but is insufficient to restore immune competence in aging.

Aging Cell. 2019 May 06;:e12959

Authors: Avivi I, Zisman-Rozen S, Naor S, Dai I, Benhamou D, Shahaf G, Tabibian-Keissar H, Rosenthal N, Rakovsky A, Hanna A, Shechter A, Peled E, Benyamini N, Dmitrukha E, Barshack I, Mehr R, Melamed D

Abstract
Aging is associated with increasing prevalence and severity of infections caused by a decline in bone marrow (BM) lymphopoiesis and reduced B-cell repertoire diversity. The current study proposes a strategy to enhance immune responsiveness in aged mice and humans, through rejuvenation of the B lineage upon B-cell depletion. We used hCD20Tg mice to deplete peripheral B cells in old and young mice, analyzing B-cell subsets, repertoire and cellular functions in vitro, and immune responsiveness in vivo. Additionally, elderly patients, previously treated with rituximab healthy elderly and young individuals, were vaccinated against hepatitis B (HBV) after undergoing a detailed analysis for B-cell compartments. B-cell depletion in old mice resulted in rejuvenated B-cell population that was derived from de novo synthesis in the bone marrow. The rejuvenated B cells exhibited a "young"-like repertoire and cellular responsiveness to immune stimuli in vitro. Yet, mice treated with B-cell depletion did not mount enhanced antibody responses to immunization in vivo, nor did they survive longer than control mice in "dirty" environment. Consistent with these results, peripheral B cells from elderly depleted patients showed a "young"-like repertoire, population dynamics, and cellular responsiveness to stimulus. Nevertheless, the response rate to HBV vaccination was similar between elderly depleted and nondepleted subjects, although antibody titers were higher in depleted patients. This study proposes a proof of principle to rejuvenate the peripheral B-cell compartment in aging, through B-cell depletion. Further studies are warranted in order to apply this approach for enhancing humoral immune responsiveness among the elderly population.

PMID: 31056853 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

A systematic review of existing peripheral biomarkers of cognitive aging: Is there enough evidence for biomarker proxies in behavioral modification interventions?: An initiative in association with the nutrition, exercise and lifestyle team of the…

4 days 10 hours ago
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A systematic review of existing peripheral biomarkers of cognitive aging: Is there enough evidence for biomarker proxies in behavioral modification interventions?: An initiative in association with the nutrition, exercise and lifestyle team of the Canadian Consortium on Neurodegeneration in Aging.

Ageing Res Rev. 2019 May 03;52:72-119

Authors: Fiocco AJ, Krieger L, D'Amico D, Parrott MD, Laurin D, Gaudreau P, Greenwood C, Ferland G

Abstract
Peripheral biomarkers have shown significant value in predicting brain health and may serve as a useful proxy measurement in the assessment of evidence-based lifestyle behavior modification programs, including physical activity and nutrition programs, that aim to maintain cognitive function in late life. The aim of this systematic review was to elucidate which peripheral biomarkers are robustly associated with cognitive function among relatively healthy non-demented older adults. Following the standards for systematic reviews (PICO, PRIMSA), and employing MEDLINE and Scopus search engines, 222 articles were included in the review. Based on the review of biomarker proxies of cognitive health, it is recommended that a comprehensive biomarker panel, or biomarker signature, be developed as a clinical end point for behavior modification trials aimed at enhancing cognitive function in late life. The biomarker signature should take a multisystemic approach, including lipid, immune/inflammatory, and metabolic biomarkers in the biological signature index of cognitive health.

PMID: 31059801 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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Aging, Lifespan & Longevity
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=(Rejuvenation[Title/Abstract] OR Rejuvenate[Title/Abstract] OR Senescent[Title/Abstract] OR Senescence[Title/Abstract] OR Aging[Title/Abstract] OR Ageing[Title/Abstract] OR Lifespan[Title/Abstract] OR Longevity[Title/Abstract] OR Alzheimer[Title/Abstract]) AND ("Nature"[Journal] OR "Science (New York, N.Y.)"[Journal] OR "Cell"[Journal] OR "The New England Journal Of Medicine"[Journal] OR "Lancet"[Journal] OR "Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology"[Journal] OR "Nature Medicine"[Journal] OR "Cell Stem Cell"[Journal] OR "Cell Metabolism"[Journal] OR "Nature Neuroscience"[Journal] OR "Nature Cell Biology"[Journal] OR "Molecular Cell"[Journal] OR "Nature Chemical Biology"[Journal] OR "Genome Biology"[Journal] OR "Bone Research"[Journal] OR "Plos Medicine"[Journal] OR "Nucleic Acids Research"[Journal] OR "Autophagy"[Journal] OR "Embo J."[Journal] OR "Genome Research"[Journal] OR "Developmental Cell"[Journal] OR "Genes & Development"[Journal] OR "Proceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The United States Of America"[Journal] OR "Plos Biology"[Journal] OR "Ageing Research Reviews"[Journal] OR "The Journal Of Cell Biology"[Journal] OR "Molecular and cellular biology"[Journal] OR "Aging Cell"[Journal] OR "Elife"[Journal] OR "Aging"[Journal]) AND ("2019/05/01"[EDAT] : "3000"[EDAT])
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